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2nd Marine Aircraft Wing

 

2nd Marine Aircraft Wing

MCAS BEAUFORT MCAS CHERRY POINT MCAS NEW RIVER
2nd Marine Aircraft Wing
Pfc. Jason Gautreaux (left) and Lance Cpl. Mitch Gautreaux sit together on a CH-53E Super Stallion preparing to fly from Marine Corps Air Station New River, N.C. to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 16, 2017. Both Marines will soon be assigned to units in close proximity to one another after graduating from Squadron Intelligence Training Certification Course. Jason will be assigned to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 267 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, and Mitch will be assigned to Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 465 at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Mackenzie Gibson/Released)
Lance Cpl. Mitch Gautreaux (top row, far left) and Pfc. Mitch Gautreaux (bottom row, second right) pose for a picture with their fellow Marines at the Squadron Intelligence Training Certification Course 17-05 at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., May 16, 2017. Both Marines will soon be assigned to units in close proximity to one another after graduating from Squadron Intelligence Training Certification Course. Jason will be assigned to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 267 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, and Mitch will be assigned to Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 465 at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Mackenzie Gibson/Released)
Staff Sgt. Cory Wilbur, right, discusses course material with students during a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. The course was filled with a combination of Marines assigned to 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and various other units throughout II Marine Expeditionary Force. Upon completion of the course, motor transport Marines gain the secondary military occupational specialty, semitrailer refueler operator. Wilbur is a SROC instructor assigned to the Marine Corps Detachment Training Command, based out of U.S. Army Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
A student drives a M970 semitrailer refueler truck during the road portion of a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. During the course, the Marines are evaluated during one road test conducted during the training. The course was filled with a combination of Marines assigned to 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and various other units throughout II Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Cpl. Austin Pastor observes a student operating a M970 semitrailer refueler truck during a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course held at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. Upon completion of the month-long course, motor transport Marines gain the secondary military occupational specialty of semitrailer refueler operator. Pastor is a mobile refueler assigned to Marine Wing Support Squadron 272, Marine Aircraft Group 26, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Pfc. Chase Rodgers operates a M970 semitrailer refueler truck during a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course held at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. The course was filled with a combination of Marines assigned to 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and various other units throughout II Marine Expeditionary Force. Rodgers is a motor transport operator with 2nd Transport Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Staff Sgt. Edgar Gonzalez, left, gives instruction to Pfc. Chase Rodgers during a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. The team of instructors traveled from U.S. Army Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., to train Marines assigned to East Coast commands on the skills needed to become a semitrailer refueler operator. Gonzalez is an SROC instructor assigned to the Marine Corps Detachment Training Command and Rodgers is a motor transport operator with 2nd Transport Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Pfc. Jacob Hankins pulls a hose from the fueling compartment of a M970 semitrailer refueler truck during a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. Marines are evaluated upon completing four tests; three written and one road test. Upon completion of the course, motor transport Marines gain the secondary military occupational specialty, semitrailer refueler operator. Hankins is a motor transport operator with 2nd Transport Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Pfc. Logan Harpine enters the cab of a M970 semitrailer refueler truck during a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. Upon completion of the course, motor transport Marines gain the secondary military occupational specialty of semitrailer refueler operator. Harpine is a motor transport operator with 2nd Transport Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Marine transport operators observe a fellow student operating a M970 semitrailer refueler truck during a Semi-trailer Refueler Operator Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. The course was filled with a combination of Marines assigned to 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and various other units throughout II Marine Expeditionary Force.  Upon completion of the course, motor transport Marines gain the secondary military occupational specialty of semitrailer refueler operator. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Staff Sgt. Cory Wilbur, left, supervises a Marine backing up a M970 semitrailer refueler truck during a Semitrailer Refueler Operator Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 9, 2017. The course was filled with a combination of Marines assigned to 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and various other units throughout II Marine Expeditionary Force. Upon completion of the course, motor transport Marines gain the secondary military occupational specialty of semitrailer refueler operator. Wilbur is a SROC instructor assigned to the Marine Corps Detachment Training Command. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/ Released)
Col. James Wellons gives the opening remarks during the Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course 2-17 at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., April 30, 2017. WTI is a seven week period of instruction that trains Marines and Sailors to become certified Weapons and Tactics Instructors. More than 200 Marines and Sailors graduated from this class of WTI. Wellons is the commanding officer of Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1, Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Command. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons/Released)
Brig. Gen. William Mullen III gives a graduation speech to the recent graduates of the Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course 2-17 at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, April 30, 2017. WTI is a seven week period of instruction that incorporates Marine Corps planning and implementation of advanced air and ground tactics through a series of escalating evolutions in order to produce certified Weapons and Tactics Instructors. More than 200 Marines and Sailors graduated from this class of WTI. Mullen is the commanding general of Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Command, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons/Released)
Brig. General William Mullen III speaks to the recent graduates of the Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course 2-17 at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., April 30, 2017. WTI is a seven week period of instruction that teaches advanced air and ground tactics in order to produce certified Weapons and Tactics Instructors. More than 200 Marines and Sailors graduated from this class of WTI. Mullen is the commanding general of Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Command, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons/Released)
2nd Lt. Stephen Abernathy receives his Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course 2-17 certification during a ceremonial graduation at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., April 30, 2017. WTI is a seven week period of instruction that incorporates Marine Corps planning and implementation of advanced air and ground tactics through a series of escalating evolutions in order to produce certified Weapons and Tactics Instructors. More than 200 Marines and Sailors graduated from this class of WTI. Abernathy is a low altitude air defense officer assigned to 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, Marine Air Control Group 28, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons/Released)
An AV-8B Harrier flies over the recently built high power run up system at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 2, 2017. Heavy equipment operators and expeditionary airfield Marines assigned to Marine Wing Support Squadron 274, Marine Aircraft Group 14, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing worked to construct the system together. The project was conducted by 25 Marines overall and required a total of 2,000 work hours to complete. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Mackenzie Gibson/Released)
Anchoring points, key pieces of the recently built high power run up system, sit attached to the HPRU system on the flight line at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 2, 2017. Heavy equipment operators and expeditionary airfield Marines assigned to Marine Wing Support Squadron 274, Marine Aircraft Group 14, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing worked to construct the system together. The HPRU system is used to test aircraft engines before flight by securing them to the ground on anchoring points and running the engine at full power to ensure they can operate at full capacity and complete the mission safely. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Mackenzie Gibson/Released)
Building 159 had a dimly lit parking lot before Voluntary Protection Program initiatives that took place aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., in December 2015. “We avoided a potential injury thanks to VPP fostering a culture of safety,” said Bob Dockery, a supply systems analyst aboard the air station.  In VPP, management, labor, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration work cooperatively and proactively to prevent fatalities, injuries, and illnesses through a system focused on: hazard prevention and control; worksite analysis; training; and management commitment and worker involvement. (Courtesy photo/ Used with Permission)
Building 159’s parking lot shines brightly now due to Voluntary Protection Program initiatives that took place aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., in January 2017. “The biggest thing is that it’s not just one person – It’s a team effort. VPP empowered us,” said Bob Dockery, a supply systems analyst aboard the air station. In VPP, management, labor, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration work cooperatively and proactively to prevent fatalities, injuries, and illnesses through a system focused on: hazard prevention and control; worksite analysis; training; and management commitment and worker involvement. (Courtesy photo/ Used with Permission)
Building 159’s parking lot shines brightly now due to Voluntary Protection Program initiatives that took place aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., in January 2017. “It is critical to preserve the workforce to the fullest extent possible; everyone deserves to go home in the same shape or better than they came in to work,” said Cmdr. Amy Varney, the installation safety manager aboard the air station. In VPP, management, labor, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration work cooperatively and proactively to prevent fatalities, injuries, and illnesses through a system focused on: hazard prevention and control; worksite analysis; training; and management commitment and worker involvement. (Courtesy photo/ Used with Permission)