Photo Information

Marines receive their designated routes during an Incidental Humvee Licensing Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., Oct. 15, 2015. Marine Wing Support Squadron 274 Marines underwent an extensive course that covered basic operational skills, vehicle capabilities, emergency procedures and first echelon mechanics. The Humvee has many versatile roles throughout the Marine Corps. Taking licensing courses to qualify Marines of different occupational fields helps expand their skill sets while allowing their unit to be more self-sufficient.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. N.W. Huertas/ Released)

Photo by Cpl. N.W. Huertas

Marines take on roads in Humvee course

19 Oct 2015 | Cpl. N.W. Huertas 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing

Marines are highly trained individuals that pride themselves on the skills they possess -- they learn to apply these skills and specialties through various training courses and exercises in order to better themselves and the Marine Corps.

Marine Wing Support Squadron 274 showcased that pride as Marine combat engineers and communications specialists evolved their ability to support the squadron during an Incidental Humvee Licensing Course at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, Oct. 15.

“As a Marine Wing Support Squadron, we are often tasked out to provide various support assets to other squadrons such as motor transportation, communications and combat engineering,” said Cpl. Harry Garrett, the licensing noncommissioned officer with MWSS-274.  “Cross-training Marines on how to operate a Humvee allows us to expand and increase the skills they can bring to the table.”

According to Garrett, the Marines underwent an extensive course that covered basic operational skills, vehicle capabilities, emergency procedures and first echelon mechanics. Each Marine in the course must complete in-classroom assessments and road miles both on and off the air station in order to receive a license.

“This vehicle is not like the average vehicle most of the Marines are accustomed to operating,” explained Garrett. “It is heavier and has different measurements, which makes basic maneuvering more complex. The Marines received extensive knowledge on the vehicle and various routes they traveled, which allowed them to apply the skills they learned in the classroom in the real world.”

The Humvee has many versatile roles throughout the Marine Corps. The vehicle was designed primarily for personnel and light cargo transport behind front lines. Communication specialists often use the vehicle to provide or transport communication assets.

The vehicle has been in use since its first incorporation in Operation Just Cause, the U.S. invasion of Panama in 1989. Its design provided troops with an all-terrain vehicle that could waistband the new geographic demands.

By taking the course more Marines are available to provide needed assistance to the various sections within the unit without having to request additional support.

“This training is not only allowing us to cross-train, but gives us another skill we can contribute to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and their mission,” said Lance Cpl. Jeremy Midget, a heavy equipment operator with the squadron. “It makes us as a unit increasingly self-sufficient and ready to take on more tasks.”

While on deployment, many Marines find themselves tasked out to convoys or patrols although it is not their primary military occupation specialty. Knowing how to perform emergency maintenance and basic operational skills can quicken reaction times in combat and save lives, said Midget.   

According to Midget, the training he received through the course has given him confidence in his skills as a Humvee operator. The knowledge he acquired can be carried with him throughout his Marine Corps career whether deployed in a combat zone or in a garrison environment.