Photo Information

Sgt. Micah Parr is a powerline mechanic assigned to Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252, Marine Aircraft Group 14, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. As a powerline mechanic, Parr is responsible for everything from engines and fuel systems to auxiliary power units and propellers. “I absolutely love my job,” said Parr. “My job is to fix KC-130J’s. Without powerline mechanics, planes wouldn’t be able to stay in the air. It gives me a sense of accomplishment to be given a problem on an engine, troubleshoot it, then come back and solve it and watch that plane take off the next day.” (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons/Released)

Photo by Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons

Marine has future planned for life after the Marine Corps

17 Oct 2016 | Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing

Some people join the Marine Corps because of its reputation of being the greatest fighting force on the planet; others join for the unique experiences the Corps has to offer.

Though Sgt. Micah Parr, a powerline mechanic assigned to Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252 aboard Marine Corps Air Station Chery Point, N.C, has a plan for leaving the Marine Corps when his current tour is over, he will always remember the opportunities the Marine Corps has given him.

“I love the Marine Corps,” Parr says. “I love the camaraderie and the values that the Marine Corps stands for and I will continue to carry on those values and traditions after my time in active duty.”

According to Parr, the time he has spent in the Corps has already shaped his future career. The Marine Corps has developed him to be a highly trained professional capable of handling any situation. 

“I joined for the educational benefits that the Marine Corps offers,” said Parr. “I decided to go into the aircraft maintenance field which has led to me receiving four years of hands on training with actual aircraft engines which will transfer to the civilian world very well.”

Powerline mechanics are responsible for everything from engines and fuel systems to auxiliary power units and propellers.

“I absolutely love my job,” said Parr. “My job is to fix KC-130J’s. Without powerline mechanics, planes wouldn’t be able to stay in the air. It gives me a sense of accomplishment to be given a problem on an engine, troubleshoot it, then come back and solve it and watch that plane take off the next day.”

According to Parr, powerline mechanics play a huge part in the Marine Air-Ground Task Force. The maintenance of aircraft across the Corps improves aircraft readiness ensuring squadrons are always ready to forward deploy and support troops on the ground.

“Marine Corps aviation is limited to how far and where we can go,” Parr said. “The KC-130J has the ability to transport troops and other assets a much farther distance than they would normally be able to go [because we keep the aircraft well maintained]. This capability allows VMGR-252 to travel to any part of the world to support missions in any clime and place.”

Parr hopes to continue doing the job he loves when he transitions back to the civilian world in 2017.

“I have one year left in the Marines and then I will get out and pursue a job in the aviation field as a civilian,” Parr said. “As a long term goal, I hope to earn my airframe and powerplant license.”

Parr credits his success to the Marines who came before and mentored him throughout his career, as well as the entire Marine Corps organization for giving him the opportunity to develop himself.

“While I’ve been in the Marine Corps, I have picked up certain leadership traits and work ethic from other Marines I look up to and aspire to be like,” explained Parr. “I used those characteristics to help further my career. I wouldn’t say the Marine Corps has changed me, but it has definitely helped me grow. It is a nice reminder every day when I wake up to give 110 percent.”


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